Violence and Crime in Cross-National Perspective

Dane Archer and Rosemary Gartner

View Inside Price: $34.00


September 10, 1987
342 pages, 6 1/8 x 9 1/4
ISBN: 9780300040234
Paper

This prize-winning reference work provides data on crime in 110 nations and 44 major cities, making it possible for the first time to examine the patterns and causes of violent crime on a cross-national basis.
“In this important book, Archer and Gartner take a major step toward providing and utilizing international data on crime and violence…. They have assembled the best cross-cultural database on criminal violence that has ever been compiled.” –Michael L. Radelet, Contemporary Sociology
“[The authors’] data and superior analyses make their conclusions more compelling than earlier studies with like or contrary results.  Furthermore, the data set seems rich enough to yield similarly enlightening findings for other researchers.” –Roy L. Austin, Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
“Some highly significant data… [including] whether large cities have higher homicide rates than smaller cities; the deterrent effect of the death penalty on homicide rates; the etiology of urban violence.” –Choice
“An amazing analysis of a most wonderful series of data.  Rarely has social science been blessed by the richness of material over so much time and over so much space as are represented by this volume.” –Marvin E. Wolfgang, University of Pennsylvania

"An essential reference source; one of the most basic of all sources in the field."—Gilbert Geis, University of California, Irvine

"Archer and Gartner have produced an amazing analysis of a most wonderful series of data. Rarely has social science been blessed by the richness of material over so much time and over so much space as are represented by this volume."—Marvin E. Wolfgang, Professor of Criminology and Law, University of Pennsylvania

"The Archer/Gartner book is a major contribution to criminology. No one can seriously undertake work from this point on that pertains to comparative criminology without using this book as the starting point. Its influence will long be felt."—Edward Sagarin, City University of New York, Graduate School

"This book should be of interest and considerable value to all disciplines dealing with and students of human behavior."—West Coast Review of Books

"The very competent researchers who authored this book on the nature and causes of crime and violence provide some highly significant data. These include material concerning the level of domestic violence in a society after it has participated in a war; whether large cities have higher homicide rates than smaller cities; the deterrent effect of the death penalty on homicide rates; and the etiology of urban violence. Data have been assembled on rates of major crimes for 110 nations and 44 major international cities. Numerous tables and figures present impressive detailed statistical information in explaining comparative crime. The references add to the high quality of this much needed criminological research. College, university, and public libraries."—Choice

"Their unique data and superior analysis make their conclusions  more compelling than earlier studies with like or contrary results. Furthermore, the data set seems rich enough to yield similarly enlightening findings for other researchers with problems that do not demand very recent data for dependable answers."—Roy L. Austin, The Annals of the American Academy

"This study, which has won four major awards in psychology and sociology, explores such elusive but critical social questions as:  "Does violence increase in a nation that has just concluded a war?"  "Do large cities have higher homicide rates than small cities?" —John Wilkes, Psychology Today
 

"Archer and Gartner are to be commended for their work in providing the only systematic compilation of comparative crime data. It will be an invaluable resource for macro research on social change and crime."—Michael Timberlake, American Journal of Sociology
 
 

Winner of a 1985 Award for Outstanding Scholarship given by the Crime and Juvenile Delinquency division of the Society for the Study of Social Problems

Winner of the Distinguished Scholar Award given by the the American Sociological Association

Winner of the 1985 AAAS Prize for Behavioral Science Research awarded by the American Association for the Advancement of Science