Art and Beauty in the Middle Ages

Umberto Eco; Translated by Hugh Bredin

View Inside Price: $11.00


July 27, 1988
134 pages, x
ISBN: 9780300042078
Paper

Also Available in:
Paper

Out of Print

"For as complex as this book is, it is written lucidly and engagingly and gets its points across in a concise and interesting manner."—Patricia L. Kleeberger, Art Documentation

"A welcome paperback edition of a translation first published in 1986 of the original Sviluppo dell'estetica medievale."—Manuscripta

"Offer[s] as good a general introduction to medieval aesthetics and art theory as one is likely to find in English. . . . The book is filled . . . with quite wonderful material."—Russell Peck, The Baltimore Morning Sun

"A model of what a historical survey should be."—Richard J. Morris, Los Angeles Times

"[A] delightful study. . . . His remarkably lucid and readable essay is full of contemporary relevance and informed by the energies of a man in love with his subject."—Robert Taylor, Boston Globe

"Fresh and useful in this highly readable translation. . . . A brief but accurate introduction to a vast field."—Library Journal

"Some original insights into an era that was previously regarded by many as devoid of aesthetic ideals and criteria."—Kirkus Reviews

"This study stands by itself as a monograph on the development of the aesthetic principles and problems that engaged the Schoolmen from the sixth through the 15th century. More than a history of theory, this essay is an absorbing synthesis of theology, science, poetry, and mysticism with artistic theory and practice—providing comprehensive insight into medieval culture."—Choice

"The book lays out so many exciting ideas and interesting facts that readers will find it gripping."—Washington Post Book World

"This survey of the aesthetics off medieval Latin civilization . . . reveals the insight and eloquence that would later gain him worldwide fame after the release of his novel, The Name of the Rose."—Alida Beccker, Philadelphia Inquirer

"An original and illuminating synthesis of disciplines usually treated separately."—Sunday Times