The Mishnah

A New Translation

Jacob Neusner

View Inside Price: $75.00


January 23, 1991
1207 pages, 7 x 10
ISBN: 9780300050226
Paper

Also Available in:
Cloth

The eminent Judaica scholar Jacob Neusner provides here the first form-analytical translation of the Mishnah. This path-breaking edition provides as close to a literal translation as possible, following the syntax of Mishnaic Hebrew in its highly formalized and syntactically patterned language. Demonstrating that the Mishnah is a work of careful and formal poetry and prose, Neusner not only analyzes the repeated construction but also divides the thoughts on the printed page so that the patterned language and the poetry comprised in those patterns emerge visually.

“With meticulous methodology and with rare stylistic beauty of expression, Neusner. . . has produced an incomparable translation of the Mishnah, both new and innovative, which reflects the genius of the original Hebrew idiom. Neusner penetrates the Tannaitic mind, capturing its spirit, its subtle nuances, and its poetic cadences. . . A most impressive volume which transcends all previous versions of the Mishnah.”—Choice

“The overall effect is a linguistic purity and simplicity which strives to capture not only the substance, but the spirit and style of the Mishnah’s universe. . . . An artful and impressive addition. . . . It deserves not only admiration but serious attention as well.”—Charles Raffel, Judaica Book News

“The work is significant because for the first time it makes available to student and scholar alike a rendition of the Mishnah which attempts to convey not only the substance of that document, but the highly patterned and formalized language which Neusner believes is the key to comprehending its contents.”—Daniel H. Gordis, Hebrew Studies

"Neusner's translation is welcome precisely because the Mishnah is so difficult to read and understand."—Anthony J. Saldarini, Moment

"With meticulous methodology, and with rare stylistic beauty of expression, Neusner, with his associates, has produced an incomparable translation of the Mishnah, both new and innovative, which reflects the genius of the original Hebrew idiom. Neusner penetrates the Tannaitic mind, capturing its spirit, its subtle nuances, and its poetic cadences. . . .  A most impressive volume which transcends all previous versions of the Mishnah."—Choice

"A linguistic purity and simplicity which strives to capture not only the substance, but the spirit and style of the Mishnah's universe."—Charles Raffel, Judaica Book News

"An artful and impressive addition. . . . It deserves not only admiration but serious attention as well."—Charles Raffel, Judaica Book News

"Neusner has done us all a service but putting his translations together in one volume."—A.P. Hayman, Apocrypha and Post-Biblical Studies

"A significant advance over the standard translation by Herbert Danby (1933)."—Paul Virgil McCracken Flesher, Religious Studies Review

"The work is significant because for the first time it makes available to student and scholar alike a rendition of the Mishnah which attempts to convey not only the substance of that document, but the highly patterned and formalized language which Neusner believes is the key to comprehending its contents."—Daniel H. Gordis, Hebrew Studies

"[This] study revealed new data and new insights for an understanding of this classical text in the development of Rabbinic Judaism."—Bernard Mandelbaum, Kentucky Jewish Post and Opinion

"Whoever has occasion to refer to the Mishnah in English will no longer simply quote Herbert Danby's translation of 1933, but always consult the more literal version of Neusner. The translator based his work on his own monumental, 43-volume history of the Mishnaic law. The well-written introduction summarizes Neusner's general approach to and understanding of the Mishnah."—Internationale Zeitschriftenschau fur Bibelwissenschaft und Grenzgebiete

"Neusner has done us all a service by putting his translations together in one volume."—A.P. Hayman, Society for Old Testament Study Booklist

"This introduction to midrash pays special attention to the ways in which the rabbis of talmudic times read the Pentateuch, the Book of Ruth, and the Song of Songs. The various Midrash compilations are introduced by an account of their main points, and selections are offered as translated by Neusner, and with his commentaries."—Jewish Book World

"[A] hefty and handsome paperback."—Old Testament Abstracts