Drawing in Early Renaissance Italy

Revised Edition

Francis Ames-Lewis

View Inside Price: $45.00


March 11, 2000
208 pages, 7 1/2 x 10
101 b/w + 8 color illus.
ISBN: 9780300079814
Paper

During the fifteenth century drawing developed from a subsidiary role in the production of finished paintings to an art form in its own right. In this beautiful book, Francis Ames-Lewis examines the works of the major draughtsmen of the century—Pisanello, Jacopo Bellini, Pollaiuolo, Ghirlandaio, Carpaccio, and Leonardo—in order to discuss the new types of drawing that evolved.

 

“Ames-Lewis’s insight into his chosen subject-matters is impressive; so is his simple and lucid presentation. His enthusiasm and real feeling for these early draughtsmen are very infectious and will no doubt commend this book as a kind of primer for students.”—Keith Andrews, Times Literary Supplement

 

“An important statement of theory about the drawing’s emergence as a finished and autonomous work of art; it also offers succinct and enlightening description of the purposes, technique and limitations of drawings in silverpoint, pen and ink, chalk and brush, and as such it will assist and educate every collector concerned with this field.”—Godfrey Baker, The Connoisseur

 

“This pioneering book . . . makes a persuasive case for the study of drawing as vital to a fuller understanding of Early Renaissance art.”—Eve King, Art Book Review

 

 

Francis Ames-Lewis is lecturer in the history of art at Birkbeck College, University of London.

“Ames-Lewis’s insight into his chosen subject-matters is impressive; so is his simple and lucid presentation. His enthusiasm and real feeling for these early draughtsmen are very infectious and will no doubt commend this book as a kind of primer for students.”—Keith Andrews, Times Literary Supplement


“An important statement of theory about the drawing’s emergence as a finished and autonomous work of art; it also offers succinct and enlightening description of the purposes, technique and limitations of drawings in silverpoint, pen and ink, chalk and brush, and as such it will assist and educate every collector concerned with this field.”—Godfrey Baker, Connoisseur

 

“This pioneering book . . . makes a persuasive case for the study of drawing as vital to a fuller understanding of Early Renaissance art.”—Eve King, Art Book Review

“[A]bounds with fine quality reproductions.”—Wilfred Niels Arnold, Leonardo Reviews

"A beautifully designed book [which] provides a clear explanation of such matters as the economics of paper making, and a thoughtful discussion of the needs which different media served and the various uses to which drawings were put, from repositories of formulae for the workshop to objects for the collector."—Nicholas Penny, Sunday Times (London)

"A thoroughly intelligent and useful book, written in a pleasingly easy style and supported by characteristically judicious design and production from Yale University Press."—Martin Kemp, Art History

"A fresh approach to the subject. . . . Ames-Lewis is interested in the aesthetic corollaries of various media and supports and in the purposes to which drawings were put. . . . Readable and authoritative."—Choice

"In an effort marked by a keen visual sensibility, Ames-Lewis has created a brilliantly lucid and multifaceted conceptual framework for the study of drawing in 15th-century Italian art. He perceptively sets forth the theoretical import of drawing, describes its part in the artist's education, and characterizes regional stylistic tendencies. He also brings forward the tremendous significance of the rapid changes in drawing surfaces, techniques, and formats. . . . This richly illustrated work is highly recommended."—Robert Cahn, Library Journal
Isabella and Leonardo
The Artistic Relationship between Isabella d’Este and Leonardo da Vinci, 1500-1506

Francis Ames-Lewis

View details