Town Houses of Medieval Britain

Anthony Quiney

View Inside Price: $45.00


January 11, 2004
344 pages, 9 3/4 x 11 1/2
200 b/w + 100 color illus.
ISBN: 9780300093858
Cloth

Published for the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art

This uniquely wide-ranging book explores British medieval houses, from humble to grand, in greater detail than ever before. Anthony Quiney synthesizes the most current archaeological, architectural, and historical findings to present a survey of houses throughout Britain from the early fifth century to the ascent of James VI of Scotland to the English throne in 1603. The book features over 300 illustrations that include medieval depictions of houses and their occupants, historic prints and photographs, as well as numerous explanatory drawings.

In the first part of the book, Quiney considers a variety of political, religious, and economic contexts and their influence on medieval building. The second part looks at the houses themselves: royal palaces; the houses of burgesses, craftsmen, and clergy; hovels of the impecunious; as well as social buildings such as guildhalls, almshouses, and hospitals.

Anthony Quiney is emeritus professor of architectural history, University of Greenwich.

“This book is as strong on social detail as it is on architectural form. . . . A fascinating book.”—Clive Aslet, Country Life

“[A] sumptuous and scholarly work.”—Boyd Tonkin, Independent

"Anthony Quiney has taken on the task of synthesizing current knowledge on the medieval town house in Britain with characteristic verve.  This elegantly written and lavishly illustrated volume is a delight to the eye and a great pleasure to read." —Jane Grenville, Sixteenth Century Journal

“[This book] is a classic, authoritative architectural study surely destined to become the standard work on the subject and handsomely produced in the manner to which we have become accustomed from Yale University Press."—Malcolm Jones, The Art Newspaper

"It should do a power of good to the cause [of historic conservation]."—Sarah Pearson, Transactions of the Ancient Monuments Society

Shortlisted for the 2005 Royal Institute of British Architects Award