Police Violence

Understanding and Controlling Police Abuse of Force

Edited by William A. Geller and Hans Toch

View Inside Price: $37.00


December 11, 1959
392 pages, 6 1/8 x 9 1/4
ISBN: 9780300107470
Paper

Also Available in:
Cloth

Although the prevalence of police-citizen conflict has diminished in recent decades, police use of excessive force remains a concern of police departments nationwide. This timely book focuses on what is known and what still needs to be learned to understand, prevent, and remediate police abuse of force.

The topics covered include: a theory of police abuse of force; the causes of police brutality; measures of its prevalence; the violence-prone police officer; public opinion about police abuse of force; the issue of race; officer selection, training, and attitudes; police unions and police culture; administrative review; procedural justice and the review of citizen complaints; the role of lawsuits; and a survey of police brutality abroad. In the final chapter Geller and Toch suggest new directions for research and practical innovations in law enforcement, from which both police and citizens can benefit. The contributors to this volume are scholars of criminology, criminal justice, social psychology, law, and public administration; former police managers; a police union leader; civilian oversight agency administrators and analysts; civil liberties advocates; police litigation expert witnesses; and media commentators.

The combination of theoretical and practical perspectives makes this book ideal for students and scholars of democratic policing and for those in police departments, government, and the media charged with addressing and understanding the problem of improper exercise of force.

William A. Geller is associate director of the Police Executive Research Forum. Hans Toch, Distinguished Professor at the School of Criminal Justice at the University at Albany, State University of New York, is co-author of The Disturbed Violent Offender, published by Yale University Press.

"The most comprehensive examination of the subject currently available. The authors address the ramifications of excessive force, including the impact on citizens, lawsuits, and administrative issues."—David L. Carter, Michigan State University

"This is a collection of essays of much wider significance than the use of force by the police. There is much more to be learned here about policing generally than might be assumed from the book's title and I urge colleagues to read it."—P.A.J. Waddington, British Journal of Criminology

"Anyone trying to understand, prevents, and remediate police violence should read this volume."—Choice

"Police Violence combines theoretical and practical perspectives, making it ideal for students and scholars of democratic policing and for those in police departments, government, and the media charged with understanding, preventing, and remediating police abuse of force."—Community Policing Digest

"Utilizing diverse professional backgrounds, Geller and Toch invite the reader to explore the timely topic of police use and abuse of force in a manner that is thorough and comprehensive. . . . The value of this work lies in its ability to succinctly yet thoroughly acquaint the reader with a working knowledge of the issue of police excessive use of force and its many ramifications. Such knowledge is an obvious asset to the student of criminal justice, sociology, political science, law, or psychology. But its usefulness goes beyond the classroom to provide understanding, valuable perspective, and insight to police practitioners, other members of government, and those who work in the media."—Timothy F. Apolito, Contemporary Psychology

"Geller and Toch have assembled an impressive collection of articles on all aspects of police violence. This is clearly the most comprehensive array of information on this topic currently available. As such it makes a valuable contribution to our knowledge of police operations and issues. . . . It covers the topic areas well and can be either an ideal supplement to traditional police texts or a stand-alone book for an issues course on police violence."—Richard N. Holden, Criminal Justice Review