Thomas Hope

Regency Designer

David Watkin

View Inside Price: $75.00


June 5, 2008
520 pages, 11 x 12 1/2
40 b/w + 420 color illus.
ISBN: 9780300124163
Cloth

Published in association with The Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, Design, and Culture

The son of the wealthiest merchant bankers in Europe, Thomas Hope (1769-1831) was a major catalyst in the arts of Regency England. At the age of 18, he embarked on a Grand Tour to the Continent and started to assemble the remarkable art collection that he later installed in his Duchess Street house in central London. Hope’s remodeling and interior decoration of that house fostered what became known as the Regency.

 

This book is the most comprehensive study to date of Thomas Hope, focusing on his multifaceted role as designer and patron. The contributors examine his wide-ranging contribution to the arts as well as his extensive writings. Richly illustrated with new photographs, the volume presents a vast array of paintings, furniture, sculpture, and works of art, many of which have never been published before.

David Watkin is professor of the history of architecture at the University of Cambridge. He is the author of a previous book on Thomas Hope and of others on James “Athenian” Stuart, Sir John Soane, and King George III, as well as several architectural survey volumes. Philip Hewat-Jaboor is an independent scholar, collector, and curator. Together with David Watkin and Daniella Ben Arie he is curator of the Thomas Hope exhibition.


EXHIBITION SCHEDULE

·   Victoria & Albert Museum, London (March 21 – July 21, 2008)

·       

·        The Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, Design, and Culture, New York City (opens July 17, 2008)

"Expert authors develop specific qualities of Hope's ideas with a wealth of pictorial evidence that shows what he and a multitude of helpers produced. . . . The definitive record and anlysis of Hope's accomplishments. It explores the subject more deeply than the physical exhibition can do and one will return to it for years."—Thomas Gordon Smith, Period Homes

"The effort that went into assembling objects for the exhibition and texts for the accompanying catalogue was fully justified by the results, yielding the most complete panorama of Hope's activities as a designer and collector since the contents of his residences were dispersed."—Christopher Drew Armstrong, College Art Association

Shortlisted for the 2009 Sir Banister Fletcher Award presented by the Authors' Club

Shortlisted for the 2008 William M. B. Berger Prize for British Art History sponsored by the Berger Collection Educational Trust and the British Art Journal