Genocide on the Drina River

Edina Becirevic

View Inside Price: $65.00


July 29, 2014
264 pages, 6 1/8 x 9 1/4
ISBN: 9780300192582
Cloth

In this scholarly yet intensely personal history, author Edina Becirevic explores the widespread ethnic cleansing that occurred in Bosnia and Herzegovina from 1992 through 1995, war crimes and crimes against humanity committed by Serbs against Bosnian Muslims that fully meet the criteria for genocide established after World War II by the Genocide Convention of 1948. An in-depth study of the devastating and dehumanizing effects of genocide on individual destinies and the mechanisms of its denial in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Becirevic's essential history contextualizes the East Bosnian program of atrocities with respect to broader scholarly debates about the nature of genocide.

Edina Becirevic is a member of the faculty of Criminal Justice, Criminology, and Security Studies at the University of Sarajevo and a cofounder of the Center for Justice and Reconciliation in Bosnia and Herzegovina. She lives in Sarajevo.
“Profoundly researched and skillfully delivered, this book offers a much-needed insider’s view of the vile, premeditated crimes committed in the wars for the legacy of Yugoslavia." - Sonja Biserko, author of Yugoslavia's Implosion (Norwegian Helsinki Committee, 2012)
"This is an excellent, groundbreaking work that will be the best English-language study of the genocide in Bosnia; possibly the best in any language. It is detailed and sophisticated enough to be used by specialists, but accessible enough to be used by undergraduates." - Marko Attila Hoare, Associate Professor, Kingston University, author of The History of Bosnia: From the Middle Ages to the Present Day (Saqi Books, 2007)

“Becirevic walks the reader through the controversy surrounding the concept and definition of 'genocide,' then makes an energetic case that the term applies to the war waged by Serbian forces in Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1992–95.”—Foreign Affairs

“[T]his book is thought-provoking and valuable . . .”—Iva Vukušic, Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal