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What SUP from Your Favorite University Presses, April 11, 2014

sup-300x209Welcome to our weekly roundup of news from university presses! Once again, there is a lot to share this week from our fellow academic publishing houses and much to learn on What SUP at the social university presses. This week, we celebrate National Poetry Month, learn about modern art, and consider the concept of masculinity. What did you read this week?

Columbia University Press shares an excerpt from The Other Blacklist: The African American Literary and Cultural Left of the 1950s by Mary Helen Washington and chats with author Michael Yogg about Paul Cabot, a pioneer of the mutual fund industry, and the emergence of this industry.

For National Poetry Month, Duke University Press provides recommendations of poetry titles old and new.

NYU Press muses on depictions of masculinity on television and stresses the importance of interrogating stories about men with an excerpt from Cable Guys: Television and Masculinities in the 21st Century by Amanda D. Lotz.

Johns Hopkins University Press is also celebrating National Poetry Month – in a guest post, poet Brian Swann spotlights some poems from his latest collection In Late Light and contemplates poetry as a kind of presence.

Temple University Press showcases a recent TEDx talk from Liberty Walther Barnes, author of Conceiving Masculinity: Male Infertility, Medicine, and Identity, and ponders if masculinity is stifling our scientific imaginations.

Over in the Pacific Northwest, Oregon State University Press reflects on current events and the 24-hour news cycle to make a case for why we need to slow down our news in a guest post from Slow News: A Manifesto for the Critical News Consumer author Peter Laufer.

For World Art Day, Oxford University Press investigates the history of street photography with an article by Lisa Hostetler from Grove Art Online. Street photography, she explains, consist of “photographs exposed in and of an urban environment and made with artistic intent.”

Princeton University Press shares highlights from the Oxford Literary Festival, which included talks from Princeton authors on what is sacred, why Byzantium is key to our understanding of other historical periods, differing forms of liberalism, and more.

Stanford University Press converses with 15 Sports Myths co-author Rodney Fort about the National Labor Relations Board decision regarding Northwestern football players and their right to unionize as well as what this might mean for college athletics. 

In honor of the fiftieth anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, University of Texas Press features some UT titles that help us better understand the civil rights movement in Texas, President Lyndon B. Johnson’s civil rights legacy, the struggle for equality in American society, and more.

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