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What SUP From Your Favorite University Presses, October 16th, 2015

Welcome to our weekly roundup of news from university presses! Once again, there is a lot to share this week from our fellow academic publishing houses and much to learn on What SUP at the social university presses. This week, we found conversations on the soda industry, intersex people, and the 2015 Nobel Peace Prize. What did you read this week?

Johns Hopkins University Press advises us to take a moment and appreciate the fall migration of birds that is currently underway. From warblers and other songbirds to hawks, eagles, egrets, herons and shorebirds; they’re all on the move!

The University of North Carolina Press features an interview on black feminist radical Florynce Kennedy. She worked at the forefront of the civil rights, New Left, Black Power and women’s movements, making her an important influence for many other radical thinkers.

Princeton University Press analyzes the idea of paradise and its profound impact on our thinking about farming, nature and food throughout the ages.

New York University Press presents five things everybody should know about intersex people: they exist, they’re normal, they’re fighters, they’re inspiring, and their issues are everybody’s issues.

Syracuse University Press features a post on the education of American youth in the suburbs. They become disconnected with regional history and cultural heritage even though schools’ geographies and connections with their local places matter.

Oxford University Press exposes the truth behind the multi-billion dollar soda industry with a telling infographic. Did you know that a liter of soda takes between 340 and 620 liters of water to produce?

Stanford University Press analyzes the awarding of the 2015 Nobel Peace Prize to Tunisia’s National Dialogue Quartet. How does the award obscure the country’s ongoing struggle, which is not entirely devoid of violence?

The MIT Press highlights Ada Lovelace’s influence on STEM as the first female computer programmer in the world by way of fashion.

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