Agape

An Ethical Analysis

Gene Outka

View Inside Price: $34.00


September 10, 1977
334 pages, 5 1/2 x 8 1/2
ISBN: 9780300021226
Paper

This study is the most comprehensive account to date of modern treatments of the love commandment. Gene Outka examines the literature on agape from Nygren’s Agape and Eros in 1930. Both Roman Catholic and Protestant writings are considered, including those of D’Arcy, Niebuhr, Ramsey, Tillich, and above all, Karl Barth. The first seven chapters focus on the principal treatments in the theological literature as they relate to major topics in ethical theory. The last chapter explores further the basic normative content of agape and discusses some of the most characteristic problems.
“The book is in my judgment the best recent work in religious ethics. Outka brings together analytic moral philosophy and theological ethics, providing a masterly survey of views and issues arising in the past forty years. . . . I can think of few books of interest to scholars in both philosophy and theology, but Outka’s is one. Unlike some scholars who are at home in continental theology, Outka is also at home in secular analytic philosophy; he brings them together in a mutually illuminating way.”—Donald Evans
“Outka has mastered this vast literature on love, and has brought a critical and clarifying analysis to bear upon it. This is a most important book on a most important subject, and brings the whole discussion into a new phase.”—John Macquarrie
“The first thing to be said about Outka’s book quite simply is that it is excellent; in fact, it is probably the very best available book about contemporary Christian ethical theory.”—The Humanities Association Review

“The book is in my judgment the best recent work in religious ethics. Outka brings together analytic moral philosophy and theological ethics, providing a masterly survey of views and issues arising in the past forty years. . . . I can think of few books of interest to scholars in both philosophy and theology, but Outka’s is one. Unlike some scholars who are at home in continental theology, Outka is also at home in secular analytic philosophy; he brings them together in a mutually illuminating way.”—Donald Evans

 

“Outka has mastered this vast literature on love, and has brought a critical and clarifying analysis to bear upon it. This is a most important book on a most important subject, and brings the whole discussion into a new phase.”—John Macquarrie

 

“The first thing to be said about Outka’s book quite simply is that it is excellent; in fact, it is probably the very best available book about contemporary Christian ethical theory.”—The Humanities Association Review

"Outka offers an extremely interesting and useful study of the concept of agape concentrating upon recent theological literature, but discussing this in relationship to recent analytic moral philosophy. . . . The juxtaposition of recent theology . . . with British analytic moral philosophy offers a fruitful and unique setting for the discussion."—Review of Metaphysics

"A work of significance in both theological ethics and moral philosophy, this book treats numerous aspects of agape as presented in theological literature, especially that of Karl Barth; includes the author's own position."—Religious Book Review

"A book which must be attended to by anyone interested in Christian love and Christian ethics."—Journal of Religion

"Professor Outka presents the reader with many valuable insights into the main problems surrounding a modern understanding of the meaning of agape. His main concern is with the issues raised in the minds of various outstanding thinkers, such as Kierkegaard, Nygren, D'Arcy, Niebuhr, Fletcher and Tillich, with respect to the implementation of the 'golden rule.' . . . In addition, Outka gives a new dimension to the subject-matter by relating some of the problems with agape to the ways in which modern 'analytic' philosophy deals with ethical issues."—Philosophical Studies

"This book is an ethical analysis of the concept of Christian love or agape . . . in terms of its logical, rational, philosophical, and theological implications and consequences. . . . This is an important book which deals honestly and seriously with perhaps the most important theoretical question in Christian ethics. Students of ethics, whether in school of theology, universities, or parishes will find it provocative, enlightening, and well worth reading."—Greek Orthodox Theological Review