Arab Politics

The Search for Legitimacy

Michael C. Hudson

View Inside Price: $45.00


September 10, 1979
448 pages, 6 x 9
ISBN: 9780300024111
Paper

The first systematic comparative analysis of political behavior throughout the entire Arab world, from Morocco to Kuwait. In an attempt to explain why the Arab world remains in ferment, Hudson discusses such crucial factors as Arab and Islamic identity, ethnic and religious minorities, the crisis of authority, the effects of imperialism, and modernization.

"An impressive work of scholarship on the political culture and changing society of the entire Arab World. The author gives us a good picture of each country as he pursues his general themes of legitimacy, nationalism, Arabism, and the inevitable ‘modernization.’"-- Foreign Affairs

"Hudson has succeeded brilliantly in surveying and analyzing the entire range of contemporary Arab politics."-- Library Journal

"Here for the first time is a really good general textbook of Middle Eastern politics. . . . Hudson has managed to provide detailed information about each Arab country within a sophisticated overall analytical framework, which substantially explains the situation in each country."-- Malcolm H. Kerr, Middle Eastern Studies Association Bulletin

"What can be said with certainty is that all those professionally concerned with the Middle East will have to cope with this book in one way or another. . . . What is outstanding is its combination of rigorous analysis and breadth of coverage. If the book’s immediate concerns are those of the political scientist, its findings and implications are important to all of us."-- Alan W. Horton, The Middle East Journal

"An impressive work of scholarship on the political culture and changing society of the entire Arab World. The author gives us a good picture of each country as he pursues his general themes of legitimacy, nationalism, Arabism, and the inevitable ‘modernization.’"—Foreign Affairs

 

"Hudson has succeeded brilliantly in surveying and analyzing the entire range of contemporary Arab politics."—Library Journal

 

"Here for the first time is a really good general textbook of Middle Eastern politics. . . . Hudson has managed to provide detailed information about each Arab country within a sophisticated overall analytical framework, which substantially explains the situation in each country."—Malcolm H. Kerr, Middle Eastern Studies Association Bulletin

 

"What can be said with certainty is that all those professionally concerned with the Middle East will have to cope with this book in one way or another. . . . What is outstanding is its combination of rigorous analysis and breadth of coverage. If the book’s immediate concerns are those of the political scientist, its findings and implications are important to all of us."—Alan W. Horton, Middle East Journal

"All students of Arab politics are in Hudson's debt; he has written probably the most significant and persuasive book on this subject."—Ibrahim Abu-Lughod, American Political Science Review

"This comprehensive tour de force on the Middle East/North African Arab political milieu should be read by every Army officer who aspires seriously to understand Arab politics. Arab disunity had probably never been as publicly displayed as it is."—Gary C. Lind, Parameters

"Hudson has succeeded brilliantly in surveying and analyzing the entire range of contemporary Arab politics. . . . This well-written volume is valuable for either dipping into or for thorough study."—Elizabeth R. Hayford, Bookviews

"Hudson has made an important contribution to the field of Arab government and politics in the contemporary world."—Scott D. Johnston, Perspective

"I have no hesitation in strongly recommending this book to students of Arab politics. Given that Hudson presupposes a considerable knowledge of the Arab states and their political institutions, the book will best serve specialists in the field. They should find it of great interest not only for the type of data which Hudson presents, but for his novel manner of organizing his material around the concept of legitimacy."—Robert O. Freedman, Political Science Quarterly