Protest at Selma

Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Voting Rights Act of 1965

David J. Garrow

View Inside Price: $25.00


September 8, 2015
364 pages, 6 1/8 x 9 1/4
ISBN: 9780300024982
Paper

“The work of David J. Garrow is more than a day-by-day account of how the historic Voting Rights Act of 1965 came into being.  It is also a skillful analysis of the dynamics of protest activity and more particularly of the ways in which successful protesters deliberately use the mass media to influence uninvolved audiences.” –American Historical Review
“A valuable book, because it is a reminder of both the heroism and the brutality displayed in the great civil rights crusade.” –David Herbert Donald, The New Republic
“One of the most comprehensive studies yet of a single campaign within the civil-rights movement.” –Pat Watters, New York Times Book Review
“An excellent fusion of important theoretical constructs with careful and thoughtful empirical analysis.  A desirable addition to most college libraries, useful for a variety of courses….Thoroughly documented.  Recommended.” –Choice

“One of the most comprehensive studies yet of a single campaign within the civil-rights movement.”—Pat Watters, New York Times Book Review

 

“A valuable book, because it is a reminder of both the heroism and the brutality displayed in the great civil rights crusade.”—David Herbert Donald, The New Republic

“An excellent fusion of important theoretical constructs with careful and thoughtful empirical analysis.  A desirable addition to most college libraries, useful for a variety of courses. . . . Thoroughly documented.  Recommended.”—Choice

"Garrow's meticulous scholarly study of the background and passage of the Act, and of Martin Luther King Jr.'s strategy and tactics of protest, is combined with a review of the academic literature on the use of protest as an influence on policy-making processes."—Publisher's Weekly

“The work of David J. Garrow is more than a day-by-day account of how the historic Voting Rights Act of 1965 came into being.  It is also a skillful analysis of the dynamics of protest activity and more particularly of the ways in which successful protesters deliberately use the mass media to influence uninvolved audiences.”—American Historical Review

 

"Extensive and explanatory footnotes provide solid backing for Garrow's conclusions. A significant contribution to civil rights literature."—Library Journal

"Garrow has written an estimable history of one of the major episodes of the civil rights struggle."—Milton Viorst, Chicago Tribune Book World

"David Garrow has written a provocative book dealing with the dynamics of protest which in his view permitted Southern blacks to gain equal voting rights, thereby transforming Southern and American politics. . . . Protest at Selma marks the beginning of a promising scholarly career."—Perspective

"David Garrow has written a sound and provocative account of protest and enfranchisement."—Steven F. Lawson, The Journal of Southern History

"This book is a thorough and astute analysis of the crucial role of black protest in the emergence of the revolutionary Voting Rights Act of 1965. . . . Protest at Selma is well researched and written, and makes several significant contributions. It adds to the growing literature on the history of the black civil-rights movement of the 1960s. . . . This work contributes to the understanding of the dynamics of protest activity."—James Button, Social Science Quarterly

"Garrow's Protest at Selma is a thoroughly researched and imaginatively written account of the relationship between that bloody Sunday at Selma and passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act (VRA). . . . Garrow concludes that it was the deliberately provoked violent response of the Alabama State Patrol to peaceful marchers that galvanized support for Dr. King and his supporters and made possible passage of VRA."—Mack H. Jones, The Journal of Politics

"[An] excellent book, Garrow has done a superb job of recounting the dramatic events of Selma and of placing them within the context of national developments. He has also rendered for the first time a portrait of Martin Luther King and SCLC that is more than one-dimensional. . . . This is a book everyone should read if they want to begin to understand the civil rights movement."—David R. Colburn, Florida Historical Quarterly

"A valuable source book for anyone interested in the events of the period or in the growth of black voter registration. Garrow's research and documentation are meticulous. He has carefully culled the journalistic treatments of the events. . . . I suspect that virtually no source relevant to the topic has escaped Garrow's painstakingly thorough research."—Charles S. Bullock, III, The American Political Science Review

 

Recipient of the 1979 Chastain Award, presented by the Southern Political Science Association to the author of the best book on the politics, government, or public administration of the United States South