Benevolent Assimilation

The American Conquest of the Philippines, 1899-1903

Stuart Creighton Miller

View Inside Price: $34.00


September 10, 1984
342 pages, 6 1/8 x 9 1/4
ISBN: 9780300030815
Paper

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American acquisition of the Philippines and Filipino resistance to it became a focal point for debate on American imperialism. In a lively narrative, Miller tells the story of the war and how it challenged America’s sense of innocence. He examines the roles of key actors—the generals and presidents, the soldiers and senators—in America’s colonial adventure.
“The most thorough, balanced, and well-written study to date of America’s imperial adventure in the western Pacific and the most persuasive analysis of the varied reactions of the American people to the military subjugation of the Filipinos. . . . [Told] with clarity, wit and a talent for the apt quotation.”—Richard E. Welch, Jr., The New York Times Book Review
“A triumph of research, synthesis and storytelling, this is the wisest book on its subject and, implicitly, a significant cultural critique of the United States at the turn of the century.”—Peter Stanley, Asia
“The author’s balanced summary of the historiography of imperialism and the epilogue, which considers the Philippine/Vietnam analogy, are valuable features of the work. . . . Should remain the definitive account of these events.”—Library Journal
“Written with clarity and argued with passion from a wealth of primary sources.”—Jack C. Lane, The Journal of American History

"The author's balanced summary of the historiography of imperialism and the epilogue, which considers the Philippine/Vietnam analogy, are valuable features of the work. The lively and interesting writing style enhances this fine scholarly monograph, which should remain the definitive account of these events."—Library Journal

"The most thorough, balanced and well-written study to date of America's imperial adventure in the western Pacific and the most persuasive analysis of the varied reactions of the American people to the military subjugation of the Filipinos. . . . [Told] with clarity, wit and a talent for the apt quotation."—Richard E. Welch, Jr., New York Times Book Review

"Miller's book is an excellent example of evenhanded but not dispassionate scholarship, vividly presented, often in the words of participants."—Choice

"The book one should read first about the war."—Kenton J. Clymer, Reviews in American History

"In his study of the American conquest of the Philippines, Miller compels us to face the other, less humane side of American imperialism, one that was (is) both racist and authoritarian in its methods and was (is) ultimately destructive of its own generous ends. . . . The book is written with clarity and argued with passion from a wealth of primary sources."—Jack C. Lane, The Journal of American History

"Miller superbly analyzes the motives, styles, and performances of the principal American actors in the Philippine affair. . . . Based upon impressive research and written in a lively style, this important book belongs among the best historical accounts of the American conquest of the Philippines."—William B. Gatewood, Jr., Pacific Historical Review

"A triumph of research, synthesis, and storytelling, this is the wisest book on its subject and, implicitly, a significant cultural critique of the United States at the turn of the century."—Peter Stanley, Asia