Wrens, Dippers and Thrashers

David Brewer; Illustrated by Barry Kent MacKay

View Inside Price: $60.00


November 10, 2001
256 pages, 6 3/4 x 9 1/2
32 color illus. + 113 maps
ISBN: 9780300090598
Cloth

Published in association with Christopher Helm/A & C Black

This is the first comprehensive guide to the closely related families of wrens, dippers, and thrashers. The book covers 75 wrens, 34 thrashers, and 5 dippers, almost all of which are New World species.

The wrens (Troglodytidae) display great diversity, occupying almost every kind of habitat in the Americas. The family probably originates in Central America where the greatest number of species is to be found. The thrashers (Mimidae) include the mockingbirds, catbirds, and tremblers. The dippers (Cinclidae) are river specialists, although they usually exhibit no obvious features for an aquatic existence. The book describes the various forms within each group, their distribution and breeding biology, as well as their flight, moult, behavior, and ecology. The text is accompanied by maps, diagrams, and color illustrations.

David Brewer is coauthor of Where to Watch Birds in Central America and the Caribbean. Barry Kent Mackay is a well-known Canadian bird artist whose work has appeared in many books and magazines.

“The text is very thorough and well researched. The range maps are very accurate. . . . If you have an interest in wrens, dippers, and thrashers, buy this book. This book is a quality piece of work. The information packaged within the species accounts teamed with the color plates make this an invaluable and accurate reference and identification guide.”—Surfbirds

“This is the first comprehensive, world-wide handbook for both wrens and mimids. . . . 124 species are described and illustrated on expertly painted color plates, which show all ages and many geographical variants. The species accounts are comprehensive and include a range map. Surprisingly little is known about many of these species, making them fertile ground for ornithological research. This book should jump start that research and is an excellent reference work for professionals as well as amateur naturalists and birders.”—Wildlife Activist