Robert Penn Warren and American Idealism

John Burt

View Inside Price: $24.00


January 14, 2014
238 pages, 6 1/8 x 9 1/4
ISBN: 9780300207569
Paper

Also Available in:
Cloth

Robert Penn Warren has distinguished himself in many areas of endeavor—as a poet, a novelist, a critic, and an observer of American history and politics. In this book, John Burt examines Warren’s writings in these apparently disparate fields and shows how they are tied together not only by their common themes but also by an inner logic that captures the analogies between artistic and political problems.

"This fine critical study is the product of sound scholarship and a discriminating and probing mind."—James H. Justus, Indiana University

"[An] intelligent discussion of the American ideal manifested in Warren’s works as the internal struggle of romantic selfhood."—Choice



"Provocative and frequently insightful . . . a significant contribution to the study of Warren’s work."—Hugh Ruppersburg, American Literature



"A welcome addition to the Warren criticism. Robert Penn Warren and American Idealism respects the contrary elements in Warren’s career and canon while discovering commonalities that unify Warren’s critical and his creative writing, his fiction and his poetry, his irony and his idealism."—Joseph R. Millichap, Modern Fiction Studies



"An ambitious, powerfully written study dealing with an important aspect of this literary career. . . . A brilliantly written book, conceived on a very high plane and worked at with power."—Cleanth Brooks, Arts and Letters

"Thanks to [Burt], Warren emerges ever more prominently as one of the powerful voices of modern world literature and, above all, as a writer traditionally American."—Kermit Vanderbilt, Modern Language Quarterly



"This is a fine critical study, well-informed by careful scholarship, clear reasoning, and presentation. Moreover, while most similarly scholarly books appear to have been physically slice from the same pedestrian sausage, it is a genuine pleasure to hold this well-printed book in one’s hands, to appreciate its discreet design and fine bookmaking."—