Mob Town

A History of Crime and Disorder in the East End

John Bennett

View Inside Price: $30.00


October 24, 2017
360 pages, 6 1/8 x 9 1/4
20 b/w illus.
ISBN: 9780300221954
Hardcover

A captivating history of a notorious neighborhood and the first book to reveal why London’s East End became synonymous with lawlessness and crime

Even before Jack the Ripper haunted its streets for prey, London’s East End had earned a reputation for immorality, filth, and vice. John Bennett, a writer and tour guide who has walked and researched the area for more than thirty years, delves into four centuries of history to chronicle the crimes, their perpetrators, and the circumstances that made the East End an ideal breeding ground for illegal activity.
 
In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, Britain’s industrial boom drew thousands of workers to the area, leading to overcrowding and squalor. But crime in the area flourished long past the Victorian period. Drawing on original archival history and featuring a fascinating cast of characters including the infamous Ripper, highwayman Dick Turpin, the Kray brothers, and a host of ordinary evildoers, this gripping and deliciously unsavory volume will fascinate Londonphiles and true crime lovers alike.

John Bennett is the author of numerous books, including The Complete and Essential Jack the Ripper and Krayology. He lives in Middlesex, UK.

“A satisfying wallow in all the most lurid aspects of East End history: the squalid opium dens and Whitechapel murders of the 19th century, the fascist marches of the thirties, the gang culture and criminal goings-on of more recent decades . . . A great guilty pleasure.”—Andrew Martin, author of The Necropolis Railway
 

“A fast moving pageant of London’s criminal East End. Familiar names such as Dick Turpin, Jack the Ripper and the Krays share the spotlight with restoration bawds, anarchist gunmen, fascist Blackshirts and several centuries of villainy, many of whose stories are being told here for the first time. It’s a dangerous but technicolour underworld brought vividly to life.”—Donald Rumbelow, author of The Houndsditch Murders and the Siege of Sidney Street