Constitutional Processes and Democratic Commitment

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Donald L. Horowitz

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Enhancing prospects for democracy is an important objective in the process of creating a new constitution. Donald L. Horowitz argues that constitutional processes ought to be geared to securing commitment to democracy by those who participate in constitutional processes. Using evidence from numerous constitutional processes, he makes a strong case for a process intended to increase the likelihood of a democratic outcome. He also assesses tradeoffs among various process attributes and identifies some that might impede democratic outcomes.

Donald L. Horowitz is the James B. Duke Professor of Law and Political Science Emeritus at Duke University. Among his previous books are Constitutional Change and Democracy in Indonesia and Ethnic Groups in Conflict.

ISBN: 9780300254365
Publication Date: April 20, 2021
256 pages, 5 1/2 x 8 1/2
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